Traffic Jam in Burrard Inlet

Leaving the city behind while gliding out of Vancouver Harbor and into Burrard Inlet, I fully grasped why the Ballantyne and its neighboring ship terminals were so enormous.  As we headed West toward the Strait of Georgia and the Pacific, freighters and tankers were headed in, jockeying for position along this 5- to 7-mile stretch of inlet.

Burrard Inlet forms Vancouver’s primary port area. While some of the shoreline is residential and commercial (the North Shore and Vancouver), much is port-industrial, including railyards, terminals for container and bulk cargo ships, and oil refineries. Freighters waiting to load/unload cargoes in the inlet often anchor in English Bay, which lies south of the mouth of the inlet and is separated from it by Vancouver’s downtown peninsula and Stanley Park.  On June 18th, 2014, just over a month before we arrived (sad to say we did not stay an extra day to visit here),  Stanley Park was named “top park in the entire world” by TripAdvisor!!

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Stanley Park in the foreground

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panoramic of the North Shore

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Not surprised to see what was around the corner at the Ballantyne terminal.

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Washington’s Mt. Baker in the background.

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North Vancouver (aka North Shore)

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